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Daily Archives: January 5, 2015

AWARE & ALIVE

Spectular ocean

Most of us only experience the very upper layer of the vastness that the ocean is. This layer is the one that is most susceptible to atmospheric changes. The ocean surface may be relatively undisturbed on a calm day, yet when huge waves are whipped up by a storm it becomes a powerful force to reckon with. But as you travel beneath the surface the influences of the changing weather patterns decrease and greater stability can be experienced. At sufficient depths one remains unmoved by the ongoing turbulence on the surface.

This analogy can be used to describe the dynamics of the mind. The mental forms of perceptions, feelings, emotions, and thoughts that come and go can be compared to the ocean waves that spontaneously form at the surface, persist for a while, and then dissipate back to that vast reservoir from which they arose,

Meditation is often mistakenly considered as a means of “escaping” the turbulence of mental forms by somehow suppressing or cutting ourselves off from the existence of these “waves” that have a tendency to toss us about and continually knock us off balance

But meditation is about developing a different relation with the mental forms that continuously arise in our mind – “our” perceptions, feelings, emotions, and thoughts. Rather than suppressing them, or denying them, its about learning to not cling to them and to not infuse them with a sense of a permanent independent identity that is against their very nature. In the process of letting go and loosening our tendency to grasp at and identify with the “surface” activity of “things,” we begin to develop a stronger awareness of the formless depth which is the basis for such activity. We begin to develop a better appreciation for the relation between the personal and the universal – between the form and formless.

Meditation involves being with your thoughts as they are, neither grasping at them nor pushing them away. That is, being open to the way things are in each moment without trying to manipulate or change the experience—without judging it, clinging to it, or pushing it away. It is to realize that thoughts, emotions and feelings are just waves on the surface of the ocean, . By doing this become aware and alive to life as it unfolds in the present through thoughts, feelings and perceptions..

NAMASTE.

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Posted by on January 5, 2015 in Awareness

 

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ABOUT YOUR THINKING.  

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Most people these days are stressed out by the fast pace of life, economy, and worries about the future. Most people would be much happier and healthier if they knew how to slow down and live in the moment.   Mindfulness is an internal resource that all of us already have within us. The idea is to channel or direct this resource to transform our relationships with stress, emotions, pain, and illness. Not being aware of the mechanics of your inner state is like falling asleep while driving at high speeds – becoming aware gives you the power to retake responsibility and to choose happiness and peace over the vicious control dramas of the ego.

Mindfulness means maintaining a moment-by-moment awareness of our thoughts, feelings, bodily sensations, and surrounding environment.  When we practice mindfulness, our thoughts tune into what we’re sensing in the present moment rather than rehashing the past or imagining the future. You cannot find yourself in the past or future. The only place where you can find yourself in the NOW Mindfulness allows us to be fully present, attending to the moment, deeply engaged and yet at peace.

While most people seem to think that mindfulness is a good thing, many people are confused about what exactly mindfulness is. Does it involve emptying the brain of thoughts, inducing relaxation, or going into a trance? Do you have to go live in an ashram and retreat from the material world to practice it effectively?  Is it a kind of religion or cult, and is it potentially dangerous?  In fact, none of the above has been shown to be true.

Mindfulness is the ability to live life more fully aware of what’s going on both around us and in our minds. Through that awareness, we become more familiar with our ongoing mental habits. That awareness increases our ability to pick and choose (without expecting total success) which ones to continue and from which we might step back at any moment

Studies have confirmed that:-

Mindfulness is good for our bodies as it boosts our immune system’s ability to fight off illness.

Mindfulness is good for our minds because it increases positive emotions while reducing negative emotions and stress.

Mindfulness changes our brain, since it increases density of grey matter in brain regions linked to learning, memory, emotion regulation, and empathy.

Mindfulness helps us focus by tuning out distractions and improving our memory and attention skills.

Mindfulness fosters compassion and altruism making us more likely to help someone in need

Mindfulness enhances relationships by making each partner feel more optimistic and relaxed, and enabling them feel more accepting of and closer to one another.

Developing an observing mind that, watches your own daily experiences, notices your automatic patterns, and gently redirects your attention to the present moment is the beginning of growing a “mindfulness muscle” to help you navigate the winds of change and stresses in your life. As Eckhart Tolle said: ‘Always say “yes” to the present moment. Surrender to what is. Say “yes” to life—and see how life suddenly starts working for you rather than against you.’

NAMASTE.

 
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Posted by on January 5, 2015 in Awareness

 

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